Upstate Behavioral Health and Wellness Forum

Greenville, SC US
November 3, 2022

Overview

The yearly Upstate Mental Health Forum will cover a broad range of topics. The topics are informed by our community mental health leaders as well as topics suggested by our faculty and residents. It is the intention of this program to further the awareness for the community as well as provide insight into care for those in the Upstate.

Sponsors

Please fill out our webform.

 

Target Audience

  • Prisma Attendings
  • Residents
  • Fellows
  • Mental Health Community Members

Learning Objectives

The purpose of this activity is to educate community members in how to recognize, manage, and respond to various mental health concerns such as addiction, racial disparity, grief, and overall well-being.

Additional Information

Competencies this activity addresses: 
Employ evidence-based practice
Interpersonal and Communication Skills
Interprofessional communication
Medical knowledge
Patient care and procedural skills
Provide patient-centered care
Values/ethics for interprofessional practice
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 6.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
    The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • 6.25 Attendance
Registration opens: 
10/13/2022
Claim credit by: 
02/03/2023
Event starts: 
11/03/2022 - 8:00am EDT
Event ends: 
11/03/2022 - 5:00pm EDT

Upstate Behavioral Health and Wellness Forum Schedule 

Time 

Session 

Presenter(s) and Session Title 

Hrs 

7:30-8:00 

Registration 

 

8:00-8:15 

Welcome and Acknowledgements  

WBP 

8:15-9:15 

Plenary 1 

Mark Sanders   

Engaging the Most Difficult Clients In Behavioral Health Counseling 

9:15-9:30 

Break and Exhibitors/Sponsors 

9:30-10:30 

Plenary 2 

Frank Clark    

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: Addressing the Mental Health of Black America 

10:30-10:45 

Break and Exhibitors/Sponsors 

10:45-11:30 

Plenary 3 

Jeff Georgi   

Addiction:  It is Not Just a Brain Disease 

0.75 

11:30-12:15 

Plenary 4 

Debbie Blalock   

Public mental health resources in SC  

0.75 

12:30-1:30 

Lunch with 30 min Panel? 

Topic TBD  Lesley Pregenzer, Ken Dority, Dr.Neha Hudepohl, & Rebecca Maddox 

0.5 

1:30-2:00 

Break and Exhibitors/Sponsors 

2:00-2:45 

Breakout 1 

 

Jeff Georgi   

Adolescent Vulnerabilities:  Why Should We Care? 

0.75 

Frank Clark    

Addressing the Social Determinants of Mental Health in the Upstate 

Jennifer Piver  

988 – Hope Has a New Number 

LeeAnne Cavin (Jeff Randolph)   

Getting Started in Supportive Housing: From One to Many 

2:45-3:00 

Break 

3:00-3:45 

Breakout 2 

Mark Sanders   

Integrated Co-occurring Disorders Treatment 

0.75 

Debbie Blalock   

What to Do When there is a Mental Health Crisis  

Chris Haines   

School Mental Health:  Addressing the Youth Mental Health Crisis 

Michael Turner & Rachel Carosiello 

Sozo and the Impact the Faith Community Can Make 

3:45-4:00 

Break 

4:00-4:45 

Breakout 3 

James Campbell   

Is Faith Enough?     

0.75 

Theresa Thompson and Zach Goff   

Veterans:  How to identify, Engage, and Support in our Community  

Smitty Heavner   

The Queer Wellness Center of Greenville: Health and Well Being in the LGBTQ+ Community

Robyn Ellison 

How to Create Communities of Knowledge-based Helpers: Mental Health First Aid 

6.25 total possible hrs 

 

  • Upstate Behavioral Health and Wellness Forum Descriptions and Objectives 
  • Time 
  • Session 
  • Presenter(s) and Session Title 
  • Hrs 
  • 8:15-9:15 
  • Plenary 1 
  • Mark Sanders   
  • Engaging the Most Difficult Clients In Behavioral Health Counseling 
  • ENGAGING THE MOST DIFFICULT TO REACH CLIENTS IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COUNSELING 
  •  
  • In this presentation you will learn strategies to engage the most difficult to reach clients in behavioral health counseling. Topics covered include: identifying clients that are most difficult to engage; creating a welcoming environment; 7 strategies for engaging difficult to reach clients within the first 10 minutes of contact; addressing ambivalence and resistance; evidence based approaches to engagement. 
  •  
  • Objectives: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to:  
  • Create a welcoming environment for difficult to reach clients. 

  • Engage difficult to reach clients in behavioral health counseling within the first 10 minutes of contact. 

  • Articulate 3 evidence-based approaches to working with difficult to reach clients. 

  • 9:30-10:30 
  • Plenary 2 
  • Frank Clark    
  • Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: Addressing the Mental Health of Black America 
  • Plenary Title: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: Addressing the Mental Health of Black America 
  •  
  • Learning Objectives  
  • Discuss the mental health inequities that remain visible in Black communities.  

  • Discuss and identify factors that impact the mental health of Black communities  

  • Discuss proposed solutions to help narrow the mental health inequity gap in Black communities  

  •  
  • 10:45-11:30 
  • Plenary 3 
  • Jeff Georgi   
  • Addiction:  It is Not Just a Brain Disease 
  • 0.75 
  •  
  • Addiction:  It’s Not Just a Brain Disease 
  •  
  • For too long we have talked about substance use disorders (SUD) as brain disease.  While the brain and the central nervous system are the dominant organs involved, addiction impacts all organs of the body and can only be understood by putting the afflicted person in a family and community context.  The Biological/Psychological/Social/Spiritual/Experiential Model (BPSSEM) takes a wholistic approach to this complex illness challenging stigma and emphasizing the role that the community must play if we are to effectively address the enormous suffering and cost caused by this disease. 
  •  
  • Learning objectives: 
  • Discuss a wholistic view of SUD using the BPSSEM 

  • Describe the importance of family and community as essential elements in the treatment of SUD 

  • Articulate the importance of understanding SUD as the complex disease it is 

  •  
  • 11:30-12:15 
  • Plenary 4 
  • Debbie Blalock   
  • Public mental health resources in SC  
  • 0.75 
  •  
  • During the critical time related to behavioral health needs, the ability to know available resources and access appropriate care us crucial.  This session will review the network and continuum of SCDMH’s resources across SC as well as points of contact for accessing needed care. 
  •  
  • Objectives:  
  • Participants in this session will be able to: 
  • Briefly describe the breadth of programs and evidenced based therapies offered by SCDMH 

  • List at least three programs or SCDMH services in the state  

  • Identify two names and numbers to call in order to access needed SCDMH resources. 

  •   
  • 12:30-1:30 
  • Lunch with 30 min Panel? 
  • Title TBD  Ken Dority, Dr.Neha Hudepohl, Rebecca Maddox, and Lesley Pregenzer 
  • 0.5 
  •  
  • This lunch panel will consist of a question and answer period focused on the current state of behavioral health as well as lessons learned throughout the pandemic related to behavioral health, wellness, and service delivery. 
  •  
  • 2:00-2:45 
  • Breakout 1 
  •  
  • Jeff Georgi   
  • Adolescent Vulnerabilities:  Why Should We Care? 
  • 0.75 
  •  
  • Adolescent Vulnerabilities:  Why Should We Care 
  •  
  • Over the 2+ years of the COVID pandemic, the adolescent population has experienced extraordinary disruption of their social, academic, athletic, and family lives.  The have missed many of the normal adolescent experiences most take for granted such as graduations, regular seated education, and athletic events.  Despite these extreme emotional pressures, available data suggests that adolescent substance use has decreased.  The decrease is most likely due to less access to alcohol, tobacco and drugs and the additional adult supervision with adolescents spending more time than usual at home.  Changes are on the way.  This session will review the trends taking shape in adolescent drug use with a focus on marijuana. 
  •  
  • Learning objectives: 
  • Participants will discuss the importance of SUD in the adolescent population 

  • Participants will review the current trends of adolescent drug use 

  • Participants will identify collaborative treatment approaches 

  •  
  •  
  • 2:00-2:45 
  • Breakout 1 
  •  
  • Frank Clark    
  • Addressing the Social Determinants of Mental Health in the Upstate 
  • Addressing the Social Determinants of Mental Health in the Upstate 
  •  
  • Goals and Objectives  
  • Identify the social determinants of mental health that are impacting the Upstate  

  • Break into small groups and develop/brainstorm strategies to help improve social determinants of health  

  • Develop a action plan that is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-based to help improve the health of our communities.  

  •  
  • 2:00-2:45 
  • Breakout 1 
  •  
  • Jennifer Piver  
  • 988 – Hope Has a New Number 
  • 988 – Hope has a New Number 
  •   
  • Objectives 
  • Increase understanding of the Best Practices of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and its History 
  • Increase understanding of the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline and the 988 call centers roll in the Crisis Continuum of Care 
  • Increase understanding of early 988 SC data and goals for the future 
  •  
  • 2:00-2:45 
  • Breakout 1 
  •  
  • LeeAnne Cavin (Jeff Randolph)   
  • Getting Started in Supportive Housing: From One to Many 
  • Getting Started in Supportive Housing: From One to Many  
  •  
  • Objectives:  
  • ● learn practical steps so faith communities and non-profit organizations can engage the housing need  
  • ● identify the next step for your organization to engage the housing crisis in the Upstate 
  •  
  •  
  • 3:00-3:45 
  • Breakout 2 
  • Mark Sanders   
  • Integrated Co-occurring Disorders Treatment 
  • 0.75 
  • INTEGRATED CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS TREATMENT 
  •  
  • Mental Illness and addiction overlap at the rate of 50 to 70%. Few programs address co-occurring disorders treatment in an integrated manner. In this presentation you will learn: how to integrate mental health and addictions treatment; 10 components of integrated co-occurring disorders treatment; evidence based co-occurring disorders treatment; the role of peers in integrated co-occurring disorders treatment. Evaluating your programs effectiveness in addressing co-occurring disorders and making plans for improvement. 
  •  
  • Objectives: By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: 
  • Articulate the 10 components of integrated co-occurring disorders treatment. 

  • Recognize 4 evidence-based approaches to co-occurring disorders treatment. 

  • Evaluate your programs effectiveness in addressing co-occurring disorders. 

  •  
  • 3:00-3:45 
  • Breakout 2 
  • Debbie Blalock   
  • What to Do When there is a Mental Health Crisis  
  •  
  • What to Do When there is a Mental Health Crisis  
  •  
  • In the midst of a mental health crisis, it can be difficult to know how to respond or what resources to attempt to access.  The implementation of the 988 system this year is one way of assisting those in need access vital care during their time of need.  This session will address questions such as Who to call, Who will respond, and Where to go when a person is in crisis. 
  •  
  • Objectives:  
  • Participants in this session will be able to: 
  • Articulate basic trends related to mental health in SC  

  • Describe the role of 988 related to addressing behavioral health needs 

  • Identify steps in the process a person in need can expect when utilizing 988 

  •  
  • 3:00-3:45 
  • Breakout 2 
  • Chris Haines   
  • School Mental Health:  Addressing the Youth Mental Health Crisis 
  •  
  • School Mental Health: Addressing the Youth Mental Health Crisis 
  •   
  • Youth in the US, including South Carolina, are experiencing a mental health crisis. This session will present the data on mental health problems facing children, including those exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants will learn about School Mental Health Programs, how they function in schools, and their importance in increasing access to mental health care for children.  
  •  
  • Objectives: 
  • Participants in this session will be able to:  
  • Describe Greater Greenville Mental Health Center’s School Mental Health Program 

  • Identify two ways that this partnership seeks address the mental health needs of all children in Greenville County. 

  •  
  •  
  • 3:00-3:45 
  • Breakout 2 
  • Michael Turner & Rachel Carosiello 
  • Sozo and the Impact the Faith Community Can Make 
  •  
  • Sozo and the Impact the Faith Community Can Make 
  •  
  •  
  • Three Objectives: 
  • Share about an integrated view of wellbeing that includes mind, body, and spirit 

  • Share how one local congregation has been mobilized to make a significant impact in the broader community 

  • Share practical ways the faith community can be integral in address physical, emotional, and spiritual needs 

  •  
  •  
  • 4:00-4:45 
  • Breakout 3 
  • James Campbell   
  • Is Faith Enough?     
  • 0.75 
  • Is Faith Enough?  Substance Use and Communities of Faith 
  •  
  • Substance Use Disorders have long been considered a disease by the medical community.  Often, however, faith communities continue to view substance use disorders and addiction through the lens of morality.  Words like “free will”, “choice”, and “decision” are used in the context of substance use, and the faith of those who struggle is sometimes even called into question.  This session will explain the reasons addiction is considered a disease, challenge some of the ideas about substance use disorders that are prevalent in many faith and treatment communities, and also honor some of the many wonderful, effective ways that faith communities can help individuals on their path towards recovery. 
  •  
  • Objectives: 
  • Participants in this session will be able to:  
  • Verbalize the prevalence of substance use disorders in the general United States population,  

  • Identify four criteria of any disease, 

  • Articulate two reasons choice and will power alone are not an effective strategy for recovery, 

  • Describe two ways faith communities can help support recovery.  

  •  
  • 4:00-4:45 
  • Breakout 3 
  • Theresa Thompson and Zach Goff   
  • Veterans:  How to identify, Engage, and Support in our Community  
  •  
  • Veterans: How to identify, engage, and support in our community 
  •  
  • There are an estimated 100,000 veterans living in the Upstate of South Carolina, with approximately 31,000 of those in Greenville County alone. Upstate Warrior Solution, a local organization, focuses on these returning veterans, to ensure they are connected to viable resources in our community. Through programs focused on employment, The Criminal Justice System, Housing, and healthcare, UWS has connected with over 9,000 veterans since its inception. 
  •  
  • Objectives: 
  • How to identify, engage, and support local veterans 

  • Current programs and community involvement: Needs and Barriers 

  • Substance Use Disorder and the impact on our local veterans 

  •  
  •  
  • 4:00-4:45 
  • Breakout 3 
  • Smitty Heavner   
  • The Queer Wellness Center of Greenville: Health and Well Being in the LGBTQ+ Community

Objectives:

  • Understand key differences and interactions between sexual orientation and gender identity
  • Learn about healthcare disparities impacting the LGBTQ+ community
  • Discuss at least 3 resources available at the Queer Wellness Center

 

4:00-4:45 

Breakout 3 

Robyn Ellison 

How to Create Communities of Knowledge-based Helpers: Mental Health First Aid 

 

How to Create Communities of Knowledge-based Helpers: Mental Health First Aid 

Mental Health First Aid is a skills-based training course that teaches participants about mental health and substance-use issues. 

 

Objectives: 

  • Recognize the potential risk factors and warning signs for a range of mental health problems 

  • Interpret the prevalence of various mental health disorders in the U.S. and the need for reduced negative attitudes in their communities.  

  • Assess their own views and feelings about mental health problems and disorders including stigma 

  • Provide information about how to bring MHFA to their groups, communities, and/or businesses  

 

6.25 total possible hrs 

Greenville Memorial Hospital
107 Grove Rd.
Greenville, SC 29605
United States

Medical Staff Auditorium

 

Mark Sanders 

Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, Caribbean and British Islands.  

Mark is the author of five books, which focus on behavioral health. Recent writings include Slipping through the Cracks: Intervention Strategies for Clients Multiple Addictions and Disorders, Recovery Management: and Relationship Detox: Helping Clients Develop Healthy Relationships in Recovery. He has had two stories published in the New York Times best-selling books series, Chicken Soup for the Soul. Mark has been a certified addictions counselor for 34 years. He has received numerous awards including a Life Time Achievement Award from the Illinois Addiction Counselor Certification Board and the Barbara Bacon Award for outstanding contributions to the Social Work profession as a Loyola University of Chicago Alumni.  

Mark is co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery high school in Illinois. He is past president of the board of the Illinois Chapter of NAADAC. He has had a 30 year career as a university educator having taught at the University of Chicago, Illinois State University, Illinois School of Professional Psychology, and Loyola University of Chicago, School of Social Work.

Jeff Georgi 

Jeff Georgi, MAH, LCAS, LCMHC, CCS, CGP 

Jeff has worked in the addiction field and practiced psychotherapy with a focus on families and group counseling for more than 40 years. He holds licenses as a Clinical Addiction Specialist, a Certified Clinical Supervisor, a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor, and a Certified Group Psychotherapist by the American Association of Group Psychotherapy. He remains a consulting faculty member in the Department of Behavioral Medicine, Division of Addiction Research and Translation, as well as a faculty member of the Duke University School of Nursing. He earned his BA from Duke University and his M.Div. in Pastoral Psychology from the Duke Divinity School and The Philadelphia Divinity School. Jeff completed an Internship and Residency program in Pastoral Counseling at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Medical Center and earned a Master’s in Allied Health at Duke University. 

Dr. Frank Clark 

Dr. Frank Alexander Clark is a board-certified adult outpatient psychiatrist at Prisma Health-Upstate. He also serves as clinical associate professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine-Greenville. Dr. Clark received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Monmouth College in Illinois and a Doctor of Medicine degree from Northwestern University. He then completed his residency in general psychiatry at Palmetto Richland Hospital in Columbia, SC  

  In addition to his psychiatric practice, Dr. Clark has held many leadership positions in national organizations including the American Medical Association (AMA) and the American Psychiatric Association (APA). He was recently inducted as a new member of the American College of Psychiatrists. Locally he serves on the board of directors for National Alliance on Mental Illness-Greenville (NAMI)  

Dr. Clark is passionate about the intersection between the humanities and medicine. He is a recipient of the 2019 Leo Tow Humanism in Medicine Award sponsored by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation.  Dr. Clark is a former board member of the South Carolina Philharmonic and currently serves on their advisory council. One of his proudest accomplishments involves being the co-founder of the South Carolina Philharmonic Healing Harmonies Program.  

Dr. Clark has a strong passion for medical mission work and has traveled to numerous countries including Zambia, Ireland, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Canada, and Haiti to serve others medically and spiritually. He considers his faith a significant factor in his success and his practice. He enjoys spending with his family, exercising, writing poetry, collaborating with composers/artists, and traveling. 

Deborah Blalock 

Deborah Shogry Blalock became employed by the South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) in 1993. Mrs. Blalock, the SCDMH Deputy Director, Community Mental Health Services, was appointed deputy in January of 2018. In her current role, she is responsible for statewide outpatient services provided by SCDMH, to include those provided by all 16 mental health centers.  Prior to that appointment, Mrs. Blalock served as the executive director of the Charleston Dorchester Mental Health Center for 14 years. Before becoming the executive director, Mrs. Blalock was the center’s director of acute services – those services that directly focus on people in crisis such as a mobile crisis team, South Carolina’s first mental health court, a crisis stabilization center, and services in the local detention centers. 

Mrs. Blalock has extensive training in crisis negotiation, crisis intervention, and critical incident management.  She received her M.Ed. in clinical counseling from the Citadel in 1993, and is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor and a Certified Public Manager. 

Debbie and her husband, Mark, have five children and two grandchildren. 

Ken Dority, Executive Director, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Greenville  (NAMI Greenville) 

Ken is a native South Carolinian, born and raised in Darlington.  He attended Clemson University and Francis Marion College completing studies in Industrial Engineering and Business Administration.   Ken moved to Greenville in 1979 and began a 14-year manufacturing career.  In 1993 he began a 20-year financial and investment services career.   In 2013, Ken joined the National Alliance on Mental Illness(NAMI) as the Executive Director of the Greenville affiliate.   

Ken and his wife Kathy have been married for 41 years. They have two adult sons, and in their spare time, love being grandparents and enjoy the outdoors, especially hiking the trails of the upstate and western North Carolina.  They also enjoy riding their road bikes as often as possible enjoying the scenery on the less traveled roads of the upstate and coastal areas. 

Dr. Neha Hudepohl 

Dr. Neha Hudepohl attended undergraduate at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH, and medical school at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, TN.  She completed her general adult psychiatry residency training at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in 2010. She was on faculty at Brown University – Alpert Medical School following her graduation and was the Medical Director of the Center for Women’s Behavioral Health at Women & Infants Hospital until 2019.  There, she founded and led a Women’s Mental Health fellowship training program in 2013.  In 2019, Dr. Hudepohl joined Prisma Health/University of South Carolina School of Medicine – Greenville as the Director of the Women’s Mental Health Program and the Program Director of the Greenville Psychiatry residency program.  She was promoted to Clinical Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine – Greenville in 2021. In 2022, she became the Interim Vice Chair of Academic Affairs for the Department of Psychiatry. Her clinical and academic interests including perinatal mood and anxiety disorders, perinatal ethics and decision-making, and medical education. 

Rebecca Maddox 

Rebecca (Becky) Maddox has served individuals and families in the substance use field for over 30 years as a counselor and administrator.  She has been with the Phoenix Center for almost 20 years.   

Becky is a passionate advocate for individuals and families who struggle with a substance use disorder.  She speaks openly about her own personal struggles and those of her family.  Becky’s message is one of hope that no matter how long or short the recovery, every day and every person in recovery matters.   

Professional accomplishments include expansion of services for adolescents through the residential program at White Horse Academy, expansion of services to women and children at Serenity Village, and expansion of opioid treatment services.   

Becky is a graduate of Gardner-Webb University and earned a Master in Public Administration from Clemson University.  

Lesley Pregenzer 

Lesley Pregenzer serves as the CEO, FAVOR Upstate, 1 of 26 certified Recovery Community Organizations in the US. As a woman in long-term recovery, she has dedicated herself to providing equitable recovery-based services to all people in need of support. Pregenzer was born and raised in the California Valley. She received a BA from Humboldt State University in Northern California and spent 20 years in Seattle before settling in South Carolina. She resides in northern Greenville County with her husband Bob Morris.  

Jennifer Piver 

Jennifer Piver is the executive director of Mental Health America of Greenville County.  Jennifer graduated from Northern Illinois University with a degree in Communicative Disorders with an emphasis in Speech Language Pathology.   She moved to SC and after volunteering on MHAGC's CRISISline she found her calling.  Jennifer is certified by the American Association of Suicidology and has been serving MHAGC’s suicide prevention efforts for over 22 years.  Two years ago those efforts became statewide in SC with the implementation of the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline.   

LeeAnne Cavin 

LeeAnne Cavin studied Psychology at the University of South Carolina and has several years of experience as a project manager. She also has experience on staff at Grace Church both as a Children’s Ministry Director and as Director of Care & Recovery. LeeAnne is currently the executive director of Front Porch Housing, a two-year supportive housing program designed to help individuals and families in crisis build a firm foundation with the goals of continued sobriety, gainful employment, financial independence, and spiritual maturity. Seeing Front Porch Housing grow out of the need of one member at Grace Church into a full-fledged supportive community has been one of her greatest joys. 

Jeff Randolph

Jeffrey B. Randolph is the President of The Randolph Group, LLC, a residential and mixed-use land development company based in Greenville, South Carolina. After receiving his Master of City and Regional Planning degree from Clemson University in 1983, Jeff began a 14-year career with Liberty Properties Group, the real estate operating company of Liberty Life Insurance Company. As Vice President of Liberty’s Residential Land Division in the Southeast, Jeff managed a $70 million portfolio of communities. In 1997, The Randolph Group (www.trgcommunities.com) was formed to provide development services for a portfolio of owned and managed communities. The Randolph Group’s current award-winning portfolio consists of communities in Greenville, Columbia and Charleston, South Carolina. 

From 2006 to 2018, Jeff returned to Clemson University as a Lecturer in the Master of Real Estate Development Program. 

In April 2018, The Randolph Group was placed on retainer by Homes of Hope, Inc for real estate acquisition and development services across the Homes of Hope affordable and mixed income housing portfolio.   

In April 2020, Jeff was appointed by City Council to serve on the City of Greenville’s Planning Commission.  

Jeff is on staff at Grace Church in Greenville, where he manages certain business operations of the church, particularly related to real estate and community partnership development. Grace Church is a non-denominational multi-site church with ten (10) campuses.   

Chris Haines 

   Chris Haines is a Licensed Professional Counselor and the Director of School Mental Health Programs at Greater Greenville Mental Health Center. Chris’s team includes 82 therapist positions serving 101 schools and programs in Greenville County School District. Chris is the School Mental Health Therapist at West Greenville School, where he has specialized in the treatment of adolescents with severe emotional and behavioral disorders for the past 15 years. Chris is on the South Carolina roster of clinicians trained in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, a trained EMDR Therapist, a Trainer on Adverse Childhood Experiences, and a Trainer in Trauma-Informed Practices. Chris’s education includes a Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy from John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Prior to working in School Mental Health in Greenville, Chris worked as a community-based therapist serving children in Washington, DC and Maryland.   

Michel Turner 

After graduating from Wofford College and The Divinity School at Duke University, Pastor Michael Turner has served United Methodist congregations all over South Carolina for the past 22 years. For the past ten years, he has served as the senior pastor at Advent United Methodist Church on Woodruff Road in Simpsonville.   Driven by a conviction that the faith community is called to make a positive impact in the broader community, Pastor Turner has consistently sought to lead congregations outward in mission to meet people’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Pastor Turner lives in Simpsonville with his wife, who is a public school teacher, and two children. 

Rachel Carosiello 

Rev. Rachel Carosiello is one of the pastors at Advent United Methodist Church and, among other responsibilities, coordinates the church’s care ministries. Originally from Tennessee, Rachel graduated from Emory & Henry College with a Bachelor of Arts in religion and a minor in music as well as from Duke Divinity School with a Master of Divinity degree. She is ordained in the United Methodist Church. Over the last several years, Rachel has pastored congregations first in Tennessee and then in South Carolina. Rachel and her husband, Gryff, now reside in Greer with their one-year-old son.  

Theresa Thompson 

Theresa Thompson Deputy Director Upstate Warrior Solution Theresa was born and raised in Idaho, where she graduated from Boise State University with a B.A. in Criminal Justice. Shortly after graduation, she moved to South Carolina where she began a career with the Greenville Police Department. Theresa served the City of Greenville from 05/1997 to 11/2013.  

While working as a police officer, Theresa attended Clemson University, where she earned an M. Ed in Counseling and Guidance services and a National Certification in Counseling. During her tenure, she held several positions which included Patrol Supervisor, Criminal Investigations Lieutenant, Commander of the Crisis Negotiation Team, Coordinator of the Internal Peer Support Team, and was the district 3 representative of the SC Crisis Negotiation Association.  

While commanding the Crisis Negotiation Team, Theresa and the team recognized an increase in “Justice-Involved Veterans” cases and began working on early intervention strategies. She joined the Upstate Warrior Solution team, in December of 2014, as the Development Director and now serves as the Deputy Director.  

Theresa helped build formal partnerships and referral pipelines with local law enforcement and county detention facilities. The UWS team now has access to five local detention centers and has active MOUs with two of the largest law enforcement agencies in the Upstate.  

Theresa was appointed to the Greenville County Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse in 2021 and serves on a Front-end Advisory Committee related to veterans and the justice system, for the Council on Criminal Justice. 

 

Smitty Heavner 

Dr. Smith F. Heavner is a registered nurse with fifteen years of clinical experience and a public health scientist with expertise in data science, informatics, and health equity. In 2021, Prisma Health honored Dr. Heavner with the Award for Excellence in Nursing for their seven-year leadership of the Pride Alliance, a business resource group working to improve the experiences of LGBTQ+ patients, families, and team members. Dr. Heavner earned a PhD in Applied Health Research and Evaluation from Clemson University and is a member of the 2023 cohort of Global Clinical Research Scholars at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Heavner holds adjunct faculty positions in the Department of Public Health Sciences at Clemson University and in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville. They serve on the Board of Directors for 864Pride, a non-profit working to improve healthcare access and equity for the LGBTQ+ community in Upstate South Carolina, and help lead the Queer Wellness Center of Greenville, an LLC owned by 864Pride and operated in partnership with Amaryllis Counseling to provide space and resources for LGBTQ+ owned businesses, community efforts, and non-profit organizations.

 

Robyn Ellison 

Robyn Ellison is a certified Special and Regular education teacher with graduate work focusing on Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities from Furman University. She currently serves as Education Coordinator at Prisma Health in the Department of Psychiatry as well as the South Carolina Mental Health Ambassador for The National Council for Mental Wellbeing.    Robyn is both a Mental Health First Aid instructor and an ACE’s trainer and has been awarded the top instructor for the State of South Carolina from The National Council for Mental Wellbeing.  Robyn co-authored the first SAMHSA Mental Health grant awarded to the Department of Psychiatry at Prisma and was just awarded the second such grant that provides MHFA at no cost to participants.  She is passionate about changing how we talk about, treat, and care for those potentially suffering from mental illness and has trained over 4,000 upstate community partners so far, in MHFA. 

Available Credit

  • 6.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
    The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • 6.25 Attendance
Please login or register to take this course.

For any questions regarding registration, attestation, and AMA PRA credit, please contact the CME staff at CME@PrismaHealth.org.